Tag Archives: saving money

A, MR & PR | date created: 2006:08:30

Easy ways to spend less at the grocery store

Do you ever look at your grocery receipt and cringe? We all need to eat, but that doesn’t mean our wallets should be punished for it every time we visit the store.

While groceries are a never-ending household expense (we’re out of frozen waffles again?), they don’t have to eat away at your paycheck. There are a lot of simple ways to save on groceries, and it all starts at home.

Make a list
Before your regular trip to the store make a list of what you plan to buy. This way you’ll know exactly what you want, decrease your time spent in the store and cut down on any potential impulse buying.

Clip coupons
We know clipping coupons isn’t glamorous or fun, but the extra effort can really pay off. Whether you cut them out from the weekly circulars, download them from your grocery store’s mobile app or print them from sites like coupons.com or SmartSource, using coupons is an excellent way to shave a little off your grocery bill. Although the savings per coupon may be small, they can add up. The trick is waiting for the right time to use them.

Focus on sales
Knowing what’s on sale each week goes a long way. Items tend to go on sale in 6-8 week cycles, so it’s a good idea to stock up on certain foods while you can. You can even build your list around what’s currently on sale and use those coupons you’ve been saving to get even more of a discount. Just remember, just because something is on sale doesn’t mean you need it—stick to your regular purchases when possible to avoid impulse buying things you would normally pass on.

Limit your trips
The more you visit the store, the more you spend. Plan accordingly and shop for groceries only when you have to. Buy your dry goods (canned soup, cereal etc.) in large enough quantities to last you for a couple weeks, and limit your produce purchases to what you can eat before it spoils. You might have to stop by the store to replenish you veggie supply, but you won’t need to make the rounds to every department. That way you save time, and avoid impulse purchases.

Do it yourself
While it’s easier to buy pre-cut, prepackaged or prepared foods, you’re paying for that convenience. It’s more time consuming, but preparing your own meals from whole ingredients is usually much more cost effective. Buying the entire chicken or block of unsliced cheese includes a little extra work, but your wallet will thank you for it.

Buy generic
It may be hard to break out of your brand-loving comfort zone, but you might be pleasantly surprised. The difference between store brand and full-price name brand products is usually hard to detect, and the savings are always real. If you’re looking to save a couple dollars on cereal, food staples (flour, cooking oil, etc.) or cola, buying generic is an easy way to do it.

Shop alone
As anti-social as it sounds, it may be a better idea to leave your kids and spouse at home next time you hit the grocery store. Kids are the ultimate impulse shoppers, and giving in to their requests can really add up. It’s not always easy to say no, but that doesn’t mean you should pay more because of it.

Beware of store tricks
Whether it’s positioning the produce section in the front entrance or playing slower music, stores use a variety of subtle tricks to get you to spend more. Knowing what to watch out for will reduce that risk as well as make you a smarter shopper. (“Not today, 10 for $10 dollar deals!”)

What do you do to save money at the grocery store? Let us know in the comments!

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There are plenty of bad reasons to buy a house.

Why You Shouldn’t Buy A House

“Renting is just throwing money away.”
“A house is a great investment.”

Sound familiar? Maybe you’re facing pressure from friends or family to make the switch from renter to homeowner. Or, maybe you feel like everyone else is doing it, so you should, too. Maybe it just feels like the logical next step in your path to becoming a Responsible Adult.

But here’s the thing: none of those are good reasons.
There’s only one really good reason you should buy a house: because you’re financially prepared to do so.

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again. Buying a house is a big deal, and likely the biggest purchase you’ll ever make. You shouldn’t take it lightly and you shouldn’t rush into it. If you’re feeling the pressure but aren’t sure if you’re financially fit for home ownership, there are some things you should know.

Not all investments are good
Your uncle may be convinced otherwise, but a house isn’t always a great investment. Yes, some people make (a lot of) money investing in real estate. But the reality is that most people do not. When you consider market volatility, taxes, interest and depreciation, you may not even get an annual return on that “investment” at all. While time certainly helps level out volatility, not everyone has 30 years to wait for investment to pay off. Unless you’re buying properties for rental income, it’s wiser to think of a home purchase as just that: a home. Not an in investment.

You’re not throwing your money away
Perhaps one of the biggest benefits of renting is the luxury of being able to call your landlord when things go awry. It may take longer than you’d like for the maintenance team to show up, but at least you aren’t footing the bill for that broken furnace.

Are you ready to spend your weekends fixing leaky faucets and doing yard work? Not all houses require extensive maintenance, but some do and almost all of them are bound to need a new roof or water heater or other major repair/replacement during your ownership stint. Experts recommend saving between one and four percent of your home’s value each year to pay for general upkeep and major repairs. If none of that sounds appealing, you may want to keep writing that rent check.

You can’t take it with you
Feel like moving across the country? If you’re renting, your housing situation isn’t likely to prevent you from doing so for very long or cause a major blow to your finances.  You may have to pay a penalty if you leave before your lease is up, but that’s nothing compared to the expenses you could face if your house doesn’t sell.

If you buy a house, you should plan on staying put for at least five to seven years if you plan to break even, ten if you’d like to make a profit. Moving before that could end up costing you money when all is said and done.  If your job requires you to move quickly, you could get stuck in the unfortunate situation of paying rent in your new location on top of your mortgage.

Bottom line: Owning a home is a great thing for some people, when they’re financially and emotionally prepared for the task. But, if you’re buying a home because of peer pressure, societal pressure or any reason other than because you’re financial prepared, you probably shouldn’t.

If you’re not sure if home ownership is right for you, IH Mississippi Valley Credit Union is here to help. Try our online calculators to estimate the costs of owning vs. renting. Or, give one of our Financial Services Officers a call. They’ll give you a financial check-up and put you on the right track to be ready in the future.

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What to know before you buy your first home

Buying a home is serious business.

If you’re anything like the average first-time home buyer, you probably have ten new questions for every answer you already know. So how do you know if you’re ready to be a homeowner? In addition to saving a down payment and preparing a budget, knowing the answer to a few basic questions is a decent start.

What’s a mortgage?

A mortgage is a loan to finance the purchase of a home. It’s probably the largest debt you’ll ever take on, and is usually more than just a house payment. It’s made of a couple moving parts: collateral, principal, interest, taxes and insurance.

In the case of a mortgage, the house you purchase serves as the collateral, or security for the loan. If you fail to make payments, your lender can seize the home as repayment.

You’ve probably heard the words principal and interest in the context of loans before. The amount you borrow up front is the principal balance of your loan. Typically you’ll make a down payment of at least 20% of the purchase price and borrow the rest. Some lenders will accept a down payment as low as 3.5% of the home’s value for first time buyers. Interest is what your lender charges you to use their money to make the purchase. Together, principal and interest will make up the bulk of your loan.

Like most other purchases you make, you’ll have to pay taxes on your home and the amount you pay will vary depending on where you live.

Before you close on your home, you’ll also have to prove to your lender that you have insurance to protect the house and your belongings in the case of a fire or natural disaster. If you live in a designated flood plain you’ll have to obtain flood insurance, too.

Many borrowers elect to have taxes and insurance rolled into their mortgage payment through an escrow account. This way, they can make small payments every month instead of worrying about a large annual or semi-annual payment.

Do I really need 20% for a down payment?

Not necessarily, but it’s recommended. How much you’re required to put down will depend on your lender and qualifications.

The Federal Housing Administration (FHA) has programs tailored to first time buyers that offer low down payments, low closing costs and easy qualifications. Some states also offer their own assistance programs for first time home buyers.

If your down payment is less than 20%, you’ll have to pay for private mortgage insurance (PMI).

What’s private mortgage insurance (PMI)?

PMI protects your lender if you default on your loan, but you pay the premiums. It’s a requirement for any mortgage loan with a down payment less than 20%. There’s really no benefit for the borrower, so it’s best to avoid it if you can.

If you opt for a lower down payment, you’ll have to make PMI payments until the balance of the loan reaches 78% of the home’s original value.

If you get an FHA loan, you’ll have to pay PMI for the life of the loan, even if you get the balance down to 78% of the original value. The only way to remove PMI from an FHA loan is to refinance.

Should I work with a real estate agent?

Unless you have expert level knowledge about the area you hope to buy in, and know a lot about how to properly price a home and make an offer, you’ll probably benefit from working with a professional.

The listing agent works for the sellers, not buyers. A buyer’s agent will help you get the best price, give you independent advice and may even be able to point you towards listings you wouldn’t know about otherwise.

What’s the difference between preapproval and prequalification?

Prequalification is usually the first step in the mortgage process. You’ll provide your lender with a basic picture of your financial situation including debt, income and assets. In most cases you can do this over the phone or even online. Your lender won’t pull your credit report or take an in-depth look at your ability to finance a home, so you’ll only get a ballpark number of what you might be able to afford based on surface level information. It’s essentially an estimate, and just because you’re prequalified for a certain amount doesn’t mean you’ll be approved for that amount (or even be able to afford it).

Preapproval is the next step. You’ll probably fill out a mortgage application, and your lender will take a hard look at your financial situation—pull your credit, assess debt to income ratios and verify your employment. When it’s all said and done, you’ll be given a specific amount for which your mortgage is approved. You’ll probably also get a written contingent agreement allowing you to shop for homes at or below that dollar amount.

Getting preapproved will save you a lot of time and disappointment by narrowing down your price range before you start looking at homes. You can totally avoid those homes you know you can’t afford, and focus on your real options. You gain advantage when dealing with sellers, too—you’ll be able to make serious offers that aren’t contingent upon obtaining financing. If you’re competing against other buyers for the same home, your bid may be more appealing compared to someone who hasn’t arranged financing.

What are closing costs?

These are the fees associated with the close of any real estate transaction. Closing takes place when the buyer takes position of the home’s title.

How much you pay depends on where you live and what home you buy, but total closing costs are usually around two to five percent of the homes total purchase price. Typically, your lender will give you a Closing Disclosure that outlines any fees a few days before closing.

If you’re still searching for answers, check out our first time home buyer checklist and see where you stand before you get started.

Ready to get moving? Contact our home loan officers today for more information!

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Why Your Budget Isn’t Working

Creating a budget that works for you and your family is the first step in living a financially healthy life. We talk a lot about budgets. If you’re a regular reader of our MoneySmarts blog, you know we frequently offer “budget friendly” tips  and easy ways to “stick to the budget.” But what does all that mean if you don’t know anything about the way you or your family spends money?

Odds are you probably have at least some kind of budget for your family—whether it’s just monitoring your accounts and keeping a general idea of how much money goes in and out, or a totally itemized spreadsheet. Is how much you spend each month reasonable while leaving room to save or invest? How do you find out?

While there’s no perfect budget that will work for every family every month, experts agree that the best way to ensure you live within your means is to follow a percentage based plan. The most common suggestion is the 50/30/20 plan:

50% of your income should go towards required expenses. This includes housing, food, utilities, transportation (including car payments), insurance, etc. These are NEEDS.

30% of your income goes towards optional expenses like clothing, vacations and gifts–the little things that help you enjoy life. These are WANTS.

20% of your income should be allocated for paying off debts (like student loans and credit cards) and saving/investing.

These guidelines are helpful, but keep in mind that they’re not the end-all-be-all of budgeting. You’ll have to make adjustments based on your family’s needs. A recent college grad living at home is going to have a wildly different budget than a family of five with a mortgage and a baby on the way. Where you live, how far you commute, the size of your family, etc. will all play a role in how you make the budget work for you. Whatever adjustments you make, just make sure it all adds up to 100%.

If you’re not the spreadsheet type, you may benefit from online services that make keeping a budget less tedious. Try IHMVCU’s budgeting and saving calculators to find out what would happen if you changed your money habits. IHMVCU members also get free access to FinanceWorks, a budgeting tool within Online Branch. FinanceWorks tracks your income and expenses, allows you to set realistic spending goals, and even alerts you when you meet or exceed your spending limits.

Now that you have a place to start, calculate your current spending and see how it compares to the recommended percentages. No matter what adjustments you need to make, keep in mind that every month will be different. The most important thing is to be diligent.

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5 Ways to save money on your first apartment or dorm

Skip paying for movers--have your friends move your stuff.

Skip paying for movers–have your friends move your stuff.

Venturing out on your own for the first time? Whether you’ve just signed the lease for your first apartment or you’re heading off for your freshman year in a college dorm, the prospect of moving into your own place can be overwhelming.

Moving into your first place means starting from scratch, and that can be expensive! There’s a lot to buy, and a lot of expenses you’ve probably never considered before (like a shower curtain and cleaning supplies). Never fear—there are plenty of ways you can make it on your own and save some dough.

1. Don’t do it all at once.
There are a few things you’ll definitely need to get through your first night in your new place—like a shower curtain and a mattress (or at least something soft to sleep on). But you don’t have to move in with everything you’ll ever need.

After spending some time in your place, you may realize that you have no need for things other people claim they can’t live without. This rule is especially true when it comes to décor. Your place doesn’t have to be fully decorated on day one, and will have a more authentic feel if you take time finding the perfect pieces to complement your space and your stuff.

You might get there and realize you already have way too much stuff, especially if you’re in a dorm. Save your parents the trouble of hauling your excess stuff back home and wait to buy furniture and other big stuff until you’ve spent some time inside the apartment or dorm you’ll actually be living in.

2. Ask for help.
Chances are your parents, grandparents or other relatives have a basement or attic full of stuff that’s perfect for your new place. Even if it’s not perfect, it’s probably going to be free (and that’s hard to beat). Most people have too much stuff, but don’t want the hassle of selling it. Let everyone know you’re moving and you’ll be amazed at how much stuff people are willing to give away to a good home..

3. Buy used.
While we don’t recommend you thrift your mattress or bath towels, not everything in your apartment needs to be brand new. Thrift stores, garage sales, and Craigslist are all excellent places to find gently used electronics, lamps, dishes and furniture.

True story: I once bought the exact same juice glasses used on Seinfeld for $10 at a thrift store. I saved money, and I have an (almost) interesting story.

If you really want to save some dough, try FreeCycle or the free section on Craigslist. People are giving away all kinds of things, and usually all you have to do is haul it.

4. Master the art of spray paint
Ok, so maybe that dresser Grandma gave you is a little ugly or it just doesn’t match the rest of your stuff. With a little colorful spray paint even the grungiest thrift store find or hand-me-down can look fabulous. If you’ve never refinished furniture before, this tutorial from Centsational Girl is perfect for beginners.

5. Do it yourself
Anything someone else can do, you can probably do for less money. Even if you’re not handy, there’s plenty you can do yourself to save some cash. Make your own coffee, cook your own food, clean your own house, bag your lunch and (gasp!) drink tap water. Make your own budget (try FinanceWorks, a free budgeting tool in Online Branch) and measure your spending before and after you start doing things for yourself. Try not to faint when you see how much money you’ve saved.

Have some other great ways to save money on the big move? Share them in the comments!

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How to save for college

Experts estimate that the average college tuition cost for the 2014-2015 school year was $31,321 at private colleges, $9,139 for students attending a public college in their home state, and $22,958 for out-of-state residents at public universities. That’s a big price tag, and it’s likely to go up every year. Creating a plan to pay for college ahead of time will save you time, money and a lot of stress. Check out these tips to make the most of your savings plan.

Don’t sacrifice your retirement
If you plan on footing the bill for your child’s college education, don’t do it at the expense of your own retirement. There are more sources of college funding available for your kids than you’ll have for your nest egg.

If you start early enough, however, the tax benefits and flexibility of a Roth IRA can help you hit both goals. Your money will grow tax free, and you can avoid a penalty fee if you use the money for educational expenses. The maximum annual contribution limit is $5,500 if you’re under 55. If you and your spouse contribute the max over 18 years, you’ll have $198,000 in contributions alone. Assuming an 8% annual return, you’ll have over $400,000—enough to fund a college education and still have a plan for retirement.

Sound like the right plan for you? IH Mississippi Valley Credit Union can help! Click here to learn about the benefits of an IRA, or visit us at any branch.

Explore investment opportunities*
The cost of college tuition goes up every year. So in addition to starting to save early, it’s a good idea to look for the highest rate of return. According to CNN, an investment portfolio tilted toward stocks could be a great way to build savings long-term. You can adjust your investments and shelter your returns as your child gets closer to college age by switching more money into bonds and other low-risk investments.

If you’re not one to watch the stock markets, investing in mutual funds will put a professional in charge of your savings.

Read CNN Money’s “Best investments for college savings” to learn more about educational investments.

Want to know more about your investment options? Our financial advisors at IH Mississippi Valley Credit Union Investment Services will help guide your management decisions. For more information, visit ihmvcu.org/invest.

Start saving now
A modest savings is better than no savings at all. Putting away just $100 a month for 18 years will yield more than $20,000, and that’s without calculating the added interest. It may not seem like much, but that’s enough to pay for two years of in-state tuition.

If you want more of a return than a simple savings account can offer, education savings accounts (ESA) offer tax-free earnings. The two most popular options are the Coverdell Savings ESA and the 529 College Savings plan.

Coverdell accounts are similar to IRAs, with the exception that the funds must be used for qualifying educational expenses. The funds can be used for education at any level (elementary through college), but contributions can only be made to the account until the beneficiary turns 18. Like a Roth IRA, Coverdell accounts have income and contribution requirements.

529 College Savings Funds can be opened for anyone regardless of annual income or age, and there’s no contribution limit. The funds in a 529 can only be used for college expenses. This account functions similar to a mutual fund—contributions are invested into many companies and its gains/losses fluctuate with market conditions. 529 College Savings Funds are best when you have plenty of time to save.

Other options
If you’re unable to save the entire cost of four years of college, federal, state and private grants and loans can bridge the gap between your savings and the cost of school. We recommend using the “free” money, like scholarships and grants, and “cheap” low-to-no interest Federal Direct loans before looking for other sources.

If you still have a gap after using your savings, grants and federal loans, consider a student loan from IHMVCU. We offer smart, responsible student loans that won’t leave you in a mountain of debt. For more information, visit ihmvcu.org/studentloans.

Saving for college is a big deal. Though it’s best to start early, it’s certainly never too late. Visit ihmvcu.org/calculator to see how you’ll need to save to reach your goals.

Not sure what’s best for you? Visit any branch today and speak with a member of our financial services team to help you weigh your options.

 

*Our advisors are securities licensed in IA, IL, and WI. Securities offered through Broker Dealer Financial Services Corp., Member FINRA & SIPC. Securities are not are not federally-insured; are not obligations of the credit union; are not guaranteed by the credit union; involve investment risk, the value of the investment may fluctuate, the return on the investment is not guaranteed and loss of principal is possible; may be offered by a dual employee who may accept deposits on behalf of the credit union and may sell non-deposit investment products on behalf of a third-party securities broker-dealer.

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Checklist for first time home buyers

family_new_home_smallSpring is here and home buying season is in full bloom. If you’re planning to buy a new home this year, it’s important to get your finances organized and know what you can afford. Here’s a checklist to get you started:

Pay down your debt. Check your credit score and look over your credit report. You’ll have trouble getting a loan with a good interest rate if you have a bad credit score or a loan period if your debt-to-income ratio is too high. Before you do anything else, focus on paying down your credit cards and paying your bills on time.

Save a down payment. Most lenders prefer a down payment of at least 20 percent of a home’s total purchase price. While it’s possible to get a loan with a more modest down payment, anything less than 20 percent usually requires private mortgage insurance (PMI). PMI is usually about 1 to 2 percent of the loan value split over monthly payments. For example, on a $100,000 home, that equates to almost $1,000 a year or $83.33 a month—assuming a 1 percent PMI fee. Moreover, PMI only protects the lender if the loan goes into default and has no benefit for the borrower. So while saving 20 percent may seem cumbersome, there are plenty of reasons to avoid paying PMI if you can.

Fine-tune your budget. There are more expenses involved with homeownership than just mortgage and insurance. What about home owner’s association fees or property taxes? If you’re renting now and your new home is going to be bigger, your utility expense will likely be bigger too. Don’t forget about maintenance and upkeep! Do you own a mower and other yard equipment? What if your water heater or furnace breaks? These other expenses can add up pretty quickly.

Calculate your existing expenses, and then find an amount you’ll be comfortable paying each month that won’t put you under too much strain. If you plan on living in this house long term, it’s important to consider an amount you can afford to pay should you be unable to work for any reason in the future. Visit ihmvcu.org/calculator to see how much your monthly payment might be including expenses like taxes, HOA and more.

Gather paperwork. There’s quite a bit of paperwork your future mortgage lender may want to see once you start your funding process. Get ready by gathering together your federal income tax records, recent paycheck stubs, copies of checks for rent or utility payments, credit card and student loan information. Save yourself some time and stress by going into the process well organized and prepared.

Not sure what documents you need? Check out our Mortgage Document Checklist.

Get preapproved. Preliminary mortgage approval is an essential step in the home buying process. Real estate agents and sellers want proof that you’ll be able to secure a mortgage before you start viewing properties. As a buyer, preapproval lets you know your buying power and calculate potential costs and payments. While preapproval is a good guideline, remember that just because you’re preapproved for a large amount doesn’t mean it will fit into your budget. Use our home affordability calculator to see how much home you can afford.

Find your neighborhood. You may know the general area you want to live in, like the north side or close to the river, but it helps to really drill into a neighborhood. Home prices vary based on proximity to schools, shopping and other amenities. Make sure you’re aware how much house your money will get you in your favorite neighborhood.

Ready to get started? Visit ihmvcu.org/starthere to fill out an application, contact a mortgage loan officer, and find out why IH Mississippi Valley Credit Union is a smart choice for your mortgage loan. Start with us and we’ll be with you every step of the way, because at You’re Worth More at IH Mississippi Valley Credit Union.

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IHMVCU Newsletter – Spring 2015

Your copy of Newsletter_Coverthe Spring Newsletter will be arriving in your mailbox next week!

Featured Articles:
Now Open in Kewanee
Are Your Ducks in a Row?
Your 2015 Member Advantages

Click here to read the entire newsletter early.

Newsletter_Kewanee Newsletter_Bob Newsletter_MA

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How to save for your first house

30s_couple_house_keys_smallMaking the move from renter to home owner is exciting, but it can also be intimidating. Your home will likely be the most expensive purchase you ever make, so it’s important to plan responsibly. Try using one of our financial calculators to help figure out if buying or renting is the best option for you, how much house you can afford, and estimate your monthly mortgage payment.

Experts agree that a home should cost no more than two-and-a-half times your annual income. Most lenders require a down payment equal to 20% of the home’s total purchase price, but how do you save that much? Here are some tips to make saving for your home a little easier.

Create a monthly budget
The only way to save is to spend less than you earn. Any savings goals you have will begin and end with your monthly budget. Setting unrealistic goals isn’t going to get you anywhere, so be honest and accurate about what your family earns and spends, then stick to it as much as possible.

Need some help setting goals and sticking to them? IH Mississippi Valley Credit Union offers FinanceWorks, a free budgeting tool within Online Branch. You can use it to set spending goals, track your purchases, and plan for saving. It updates in real time and will even send you text or email alerts when you reach or exceed your limits.

Reduce Spending
This may seem like an obvious move, but it’s definitely important. By reducing or even cutting spending on things like clothes, shoes, fancy coffees and cable, you might be surprised at how much you save each month. If you take the time to develop an accurate monthly budget and eliminate the some of the “wants” from your list, you’ll find it’s easier to put more money away.

Don’t overdo it, though. It’s hard to stick to your goals if you’re frustrated or unhappy every month. Trying to cut all your family’s “wants” is unrealistic. If you’re someone who enjoys dining out, try cooking a fancy meal at home once a week with premium ingredients. Are you really going to miss those specialty coffees in the morning? Try making your own flavored syrups and getting caffeinated at home for less money. If you decide to cut cable or trips to the movie theater, try signing up for an online service like Netflix or Hulu that’s often far less expensive.

Work More
While spending less may seem like a no brainer, people often don’t consider how they can bring more money in. Consider adding a part-time job doing something different from your career. If you find a part-time job that’s in line with your hobbies, it may seem less like you’re working on the weekends. Are you handy? Try the local home improvement store. Crafty? Inquire at a fabric or hobby store. If you’ve built a good budget, you don’t really “need” this money and it can easily go into your savings.

Cut back retirement savings
If you have an employer-matched 401(k), it’s a good idea to continue contributing enough to qualify for the maximum employer contribution. While you’re saving for your home, scale back to just the match amount and put any additional cash you may have been contributing towards your down payment. You’ll still be saving for your future, just in a different way.

If you qualify as a first-time home buyer, you may be able to take up to $10,000 from your IRA penalty free to help fund your home purchase. Just know that you’ll have to pay any applicable income taxes on the withdrawal amount, depending on your account.

Are you ready to buy your home? Don’t know where to start? Visit us at any branch or ihmvcu.org/starthere. We’ll help you find a mortgage that gets you moving.

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